Should you use YouTube for your podcast?

Should you use YouTube for your podcast?
Audience
Should you use YouTube for your podcast?
/
Episode February 11, 2021 00:14:46

Hosted By

Matt Medeiros Stuart Barefoot

Show Notes

In this episode, Matt talks about whether or not you should utilize the YouTube platform for your podcast. He lists and explains a number of reasons why YouTube is great for interaction with your current listeners, and will help attract new listeners. He also covers a couple of reasons why some people prefer not to use YouTube and his thoughts on those as well. 

If you have any questions about this episode or want to get some of the resources we mentioned, head over to Castos.com/podcast. And as always, if you’re enjoying the show please share it with someone who you think would enjoy it as well. It is your continued support that will help us continue to help others. Thank you so much! 

Today you’ll learn about:

  • Success of your podcast is determined by the things you do outside the podcast
  • Introducing a new medium for listeners to engage with
  • YouTube is the second largest search engine
  • The livestreaming component is a great way to interact with listeners
  • Is there any reason not to publish to YouTube?
    • Comments and negativity
    • Commitment
    • Optimization

Resources/Links:

Castos Academy: https://academy.castos.com/ 

Castos, website: Castos.com/

Castos, YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/castos  

Clubhouse video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8729ZpWpmIw 

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Speaker 1 00:00:05 Welcome back to the audience podcast. It's the best podcast for podcasters for at least I hope so. I'm your host, Matt. Today, we're going to be talking about YouTube podcasting, all of that great stuff. In today's episode, I'd like to cover one of the top 10 questions that I get here at Casos. And that question is, well, you probably already know because it's in the title of today's episode in your podcast, catcher it's should I use YouTube for my podcast? It's a fantastic question for many reasons. And if you're the kind of listener who just wants the answer straight away it's it's yes. The answer is yes, you should use YouTube for your podcast, but you might be standing there doing the dishes, going for a walk, asking why. I mean, what else could you be doing on podcasts these days? Certainly. No, one's commuting anymore and listening to podcasts, but you might be there doing something going. Speaker 1 00:00:51 Yeah. Okay, great. Yes. I want to use YouTube for my podcasts, but what are the reasons why give it to me? Well, I'm going to dive into three reasons. At least these are the reasons that I feel makes YouTube a compelling choice for podcasters as a secondary or primary platform of distribution. And we can talk about the nuances of that throughout this episode. So reason number one, success of a podcast largely largely relies on everything else you do surrounding the podcast. So it's not just what goes into the microphone that builds a successful podcasting endeavor. A lot of the support you put around a show, a single episode, or the entire podcast, or a network of podcasts. There was pillars of support. We need to get into place here. Uh, generally it's the content itself, right? Just because you recorded a podcast, doesn't mean it's a great podcast and you really want to focus on making your content the best that it can be at that moment in time. I think if you're new to podcasting, you might not realize that you'll get better. Like you might not like the content you're creating now. So as long as you care and put effort in your contents going to get better. And if you're a seasoned podcast or you probably already know this and like myself, I know that I'm hopefully getting content better as a or my content is getting better, like a fine wine. As you create more episodes, it's the packaging of your podcasts that will also help make it a success too. Right? So Speaker 0 00:02:18 It's everything. It's, it's the logo. It's Speaker 1 00:02:20 The website. It's the cover art, of course it's the content. Like we just said, it's the audio quality that you have an attention to detail on. It's how you do a lot with transcripts or show notes, the type of content or the type of people. Maybe you bring onto your show, this, this whole packaging around it. You know, if you think about some of your favorite physical products that you buy, and I'm just going to default to everyone's favorite example, which would be like an Apple device. Everything seems really well thought out in the packaging of it, right? The packaging. Isn't just how you deliver the podcast. It's everything wrapped around it. Uh, in this case, it's the promotion. Just because, you know, if you, it will, they come, the answer is no, they won't come. You have to tell them, I built this thing over here. Speaker 1 00:03:03 Please come listen to it. Please spend a moment of your time. Listening to my little show in this corner of the internet versus, you know, big podcast, hosts, big brand podcasts, et cetera, et cetera, or Netflix show. I always used to say, you know, famously when, when game of Thrones was on TV on Sunday nights, you never want to publish an episode of your podcast at Sunday nights at nine o'clock when game of Thrones was on, because everyone was watching game of Thrones, you know, obviously a bit of a joke there, but you understand the promotional piece of it. It's how you repurpose the content on other platforms, which is why I think YouTube is really strong. You know, if I were to look at any of the social platforms, YouTube, for various reasons that we're going to continue to talk about here, a great platform for you to repurpose the podcast content, you know, just because when you're done with that podcast episode, you shouldn't just let it sit here and your Casos account, you know, broadcasting to the world. Speaker 1 00:03:57 It's fine if you do, but you have a, an immense opportunity to break up that content and put little clips out into the world onto Twitter, onto LinkedIn, onto YouTube, right? You can break it up, you can make mashups, right? So at the end of every month or every quarter, every year, you know, whatever you're publishing cadences, maybe you mash up your podcast and pull out some of the clips that are the best to put it like a Roundup show or something like that. So repurposing content very important to the success of a show and as a YouTube fantastic platform to do that, you know, with your audio content, all of this stuff is just the tip of the iceberg, but it's so important. Like it really is. It's really important to just really do everything else to support your podcast, not just record the episode. Speaker 1 00:04:39 Number two, you're introducing a new medium for a listener to engage with, right? There's the audio experience, which is very intimate. It's why I like it as a creator. I feel like it's a much more connected experience. But for example, if I think about like some of the podcasts that I love, one of the podcasts that I love is talking Sopranos, Steve Sherpa, Michael, Imperioli talking about their time as being actors on the Soprano's show. And they have their YouTube component where they interview some folks who are involved, other actors, or, you know, uh, writers, producers of the show. And then they recap every single Sopranos episode, one episode every week. And I'll bounce between both. Like sometimes it's a great guest and I want to see that guest, like it's, it's, it's an actor I haven't seen in a while. I want to see them. Speaker 1 00:05:26 I want to see the interaction between Mike and Steve. And this is great dynamic. That's the first half of the episode. Then what I'll do is I'll listen to the rest of the episode on the, on the audio version. Cause now I'm on the move. So maybe I'm having practice to whatever. And I'm just kind of watching this first 15 minutes of their show on YouTube and really just seeing the, the engagement there and really enjoying it to default to another sort of podcast that gets mentioned all the time. The Joe Rogan show Joe Rogan has before he was predominantly or not predominantly, he is now part of Spotify when he was able to openly publish his, you had the primary YouTube channel, which were the episodes of the podcast in full length or whatever, an hour, two hours, three hours, however long those episodes were. Speaker 1 00:06:05 And then he had a JRE clips channel, which were just clips pulled from the longer episode in a way to give people, you know, okay. Maybe not. I don't want to listen to the whole episode. I just want these little bite size nuggets of information and you could make four or five videos out of this one hour long show. Right? So another way for people to experience your content, both in a visual format and maybe in like this categorized chapters approach, right with clips, number three, YouTube is the second largest search engine. Second to Google it's parent company, right? If he, if you don't know, YouTube is owned by Google. YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world, right? So think of everything that you might be searching for, that you want to learn visually, which is largely, almost nearly everything, but you want to fix a leaky faucet. Speaker 1 00:06:53 You want to learn how to code a website. You want to learn how to start a podcast. You search on YouTube because you want to visually see it. You want to see how somebody puts it together. So it's one of the largest search engines in the world. And there's an immense opportunity to leverage search terms and key phrases that expose you to new listeners, right? I'm not advocating that you create show topics that are driven by search terms. But if you're just getting started with all of this stuff with your podcast, that certainly can't hurt you. So if you don't have an existing audience and existing brand and podcasting is new to you and you're scratching your head saying, why aren't I getting more subscribers to the show? Well, it couldn't hurt you to be on YouTube as well. You know, depending on your topic, I would say like 90% of you out there could probably benefit from having good titles. Speaker 1 00:07:40 Good descriptions, reason. Number four, you do has their live streaming component, which allows you to interact with listeners in new or unique ways. So you could live stream every podcast episode, and then turn that into your podcast. Or you host a single live stream every month. And maybe that's your unique angle. It gives your listener something extra to tune into. It's more unique content as well. Plus, and this is the most underrated part. It's where you get to interact with your podcast audience. When you bottle up all of the questions that most new podcasts has asked me, it's, you know, how long should my show be? Which guests should I bring on to the podcast? What makes for a good episode, all of these questions can be asked in a live stream to gather that feedback real-time feedback is one of the most valuable pieces of data to gather if you're serious about growing your podcast, you know, one of these things, or many of these questions that I get are all answered by your listeners. Speaker 1 00:08:44 That's the audience. Even if you have an audience of one right now, and or two or three, these are going to be your most passionate people. Well, these are the people that are going to help amplify the show and give it to you straight. So if you do a live stream, if you have a small show and you have a live stream and you have no other way of connecting with an audience, right, you don't have an email list. Maybe you're not really hip to social. Uh, you don't have a Twitter following. You're not really engaging with people there. Well, maybe you can do a live stream on any platform. Really. It doesn't have to be YouTube, but YouTube is pretty good. And that's what you say. What do you really like about the content that I put out? What can I do better? What would help me amplify my show? Speaker 1 00:09:21 And again, just getting that one person talking to you is going to have that domino effect before you know it, that person will introduce you to somebody else. You'll have an audience of two and then four, eight, 10, and it goes on from there and it starts to grow it. Yes, it'll take time, but it's a vehicle like doing a live stream is a vehicle to get feedback in real time while you're talking to this audience member. And as a side note, I've been reading about how a lot of podcasts are no longer doing that. Typical, you know, leave us a review on iTunes, call to action anymore. So pushing people to review your show on maybe your own website that you've created. So you can use those reviews and marketing collateral on your podcast website, whatever, or fill out a quick survey and having them give you that information in a survey link that you say in every episode. Speaker 1 00:10:10 So again, this might not be on a live stream, but you'd be able to do it in your podcast. And those, those things might be well-placed in that, in that position where you used to say, leave us a review on iTunes. Well, what are we doing? We're really just driving into iTunes. Yes. People can leave reviews there does that largely help us with SEO? I don't think it does anymore from the professionals that I listened to. So at the end of the day, look, is there any reason not to publish to YouTube? If you're sitting there going these sound like great reasons to do it, then yes, go ahead and do it. But if, is there something, any reason you should not publish to YouTube? Well, if for whatever reason, you simply do not want to set up an account and YouTube, maybe you have something against Google and that's perfectly fine. Speaker 1 00:10:49 And you don't want to have an account there, or even if you think about managing comments or the account itself is too overwhelming. Well, yeah, you'd have to at least commit to that. That minor process, create the account, you know, manage the settings, things change, they email you, they tell you to like, maybe go in and change your, your cover arts or your YouTube channel size. Like all that stuff is, you know, very minor. But it's something to think about. You'll have to manage that, that podcast on the YouTube channel, I should say, you should be able to manage that YouTube channel. And if you're doing this for a company, maybe you're doing this podcast for somebody you work for. Well, you gotta make sure that everybody has access to that YouTube account. You've documented it, et cetera. And that's the only real hard argument that I think I could really understand is there'll be some degree of commitment there. Speaker 1 00:11:37 Maybe there's comments being posted on your YouTube video and you don't want to have to deal with comments or manage it. Yeah, you can shut comments off. That's a thing, but there is some management overhead as light as it is. If your content would not benefit at all from a search engine like YouTube, like the titles of your show and descriptions are simply not something you could see any interest in. Okay. That, that would be another great reason. I'd say that maybe 10% of you that are listening to this would fall under that category. And for a moment, let's just use Castillo's. For example, we have an auto published feature to YouTube in one of our hosting plans, our podcast hosting plans, and it simply kills two birds with one stone. You upload your podcast to cast those. And then we take that audio file in, shoot it over to YouTube, which copies your exact title and description that you use for the podcast. Speaker 1 00:12:27 So if you wanted to optimize it for search, you then have to go and spend that time on YouTube manually and make the necessary adjustments. So as at this moment in time, we don't have a way for you to automatically publish a different title and a different description over at YouTube when we built it originally, it was for that ease of use. It's just simply going to copy the show title and the description and send that over to YouTube. Yeah. I mean maybe your podcast title, isn't great for search. It's some, you know, whimsical Quip that, that doesn't even make sense. It's just like this funny little line that you put in, in the title doesn't really make sense unless you actually listen to the show, that kind of thing. Well, that's not going to help you with search. So maybe you are talking about the stock market or news and you want to go in and put those headlines in there so that it's searchable, right? Speaker 1 00:13:13 So that's a, an example, right. Of things you might have to do in YouTube that otherwise you just don't have the time for. Right. And you might not want to do it. That's one thing at the end of the day, YouTube is a really big platform for listening to music. So why not have your audio podcasts there as well as generally what I say? I'd even say that with recent explosion in podcasts, I'd be shocked if YouTube didn't do something for audio first creators, right? I mean, there's so much opportunity and people are already listening to music. Yeah. You could say, well, they have music videos, and that's why they're listening to the, to the music too. I don't know about you, but I've put on music sometimes on YouTube and I just leave it running in the background. It would really surprise me if YouTube doesn't do something for audio and podcasts, given the explosion of the market. Speaker 1 00:14:01 All right, that's it for today's episode, speaking of YouTube, check out our YouTube [email protected] slash <inaudible>. I put a lot of videos up there, all about podcasting and content creation. If you want to see how I record episodes or automate my scheduling calendar for podcast shows you don't want to miss it. youtube.com/ <inaudible>. Don't forget about our free podcasting Academy. Head to academy.casto.com that's academy.casos.com. Register for free. We get a bunch of courses up there to become a better podcaster. Thanks for listening today. If you have any questions, shoot us an email. Hello at <inaudible> dot com. We'll see you in the next step.

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